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Anónimo

Anónimo preguntó:

Hi Froggie! Do you believe in the friendzone?

thefrogman:

I believe in something I call “unrequited like.” It’s a less profound version of unrequited love. I think this happens to all genders and it can certainly be disappointing. 

I’ve been on the planet a bit longer than a lot of my followers and maybe I can pass along a few things I’ve learned.

First, if someone has no interest in you. Move on. It will be hard. It might even suck for a while. But trying to win the affection of someone who doesn’t feel that way about you is a big waste of time. You are just going to cause yourself more pain. 

Second, being someone’s friend is not a consolation prize. Friendship is one of the most precious things on earth and should not be discounted into this absurd notion of the “friendzone.”

If you believe in the friendzone you aren’t the “nice guy” you think you are. Women are not objects to be won, and if they reject you, you should respect that. You cannot blame someone for not having feelings for you. It’s like telling someone who doesn’t like brussels sprouts to just start liking them. You cannot magically change their taste buds by saying the right words. 

And lastly, if they offer you friendship, do not accept it if you are just going to be resentful. Either truly be their friend and perform your friend duties with all your heart, or move along. 

In my opinion, if you think you got friendzone’d, you are no friend.

9,000 Fallen Soldiers Stenciled into Sand at Normandy Beach

To commemorate “Peace Day”, British artists Jamie Wardley and Andy Moss, in combination with many volunteers, went to Normandy Beach and stenciled the silhouettes of the 9,000 soldiers who lost their lives on D-Day during World War II. With rakes and stencils pads shaped like bodies in hand, the group completed the temporary art installation titled The Fallen 9000.

The work is meant to serve as a stark visual reminder of the civilians, allied forces and Germans who died during the beach landings at Arromanches on D-Day: June 6th, 1944. The initial team began with 60 volunteers, but as word spread to nearby residents, an additional 500 people came to help with the temporary installation. Although the stenciled body impressions in the sand only lasted a few hours before the tide washed them away, the photographs serve as a reminder of the horrors of war and of the cherished lives lost.

source

via odditiesoflife

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